Booklet For New Volunteers

volunteer-booklets

When people sign up to volunteer in our Kids Rooms, we want to equip them with all the info they need to get started, and do their job well.  It can be a little overwhelming for a new volunteer to try to remember everything, so we created some booklets for each room that give them the basics to get started.  This one page (double sided) document gives them some basic info that they can take home with them, and they can refer to.  We also have another volunteer training booklet that we give to all volunteers that covers our vision & our goals as well as our safety training, but these room booklets are specific to each room and outline things that volunteers will need to know while serving in that room.  You can download a copy of each of these booklets:

Nursery Booklet
Preschool Booklet
JK/SK Small Group Leader Booklet
Grades 1-2 Small Group Leader Booklet

Hopefully you will find these helpful!

How to Focus on Kids Ministry Priorities

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Sometimes the number of things that need to be done in Kids Ministry can be overwhelming.  How do you balance the urgent things with things that should be a priority?  So many times the urgent can take a lot of our time, but they are not necessarily things that are a priority.

Start by making a list of things that you would consider priorities in your kids ministry.  What will it take to accomplish those things?  Make a list of things that take a lot of your time.  Then evaluate.  Do you need to make some adjustments so that you have more time to focus on your priorities?

Try using a 3, 6 and 12 month goals list.  Take time to write down 3 things that you would like to accomplish in the next 3 months.  Then write down 3 things to accomplish in the next 6 months, and do the same for 12 months.  Having goals written down on paper helps you to focus on priorities that need to be done.

Thanking volunteers is one of those things that is important, but we never seem to get around to doing that on a regular basis.  If you make a goal of writing one thank you note for each day that you are in the office, then you could make a big difference in a short amount of time, on a regular basis.

I created a “To Do” list and customized it for Kids Ministry to help keep me on track.  Some things are pre-printed on the list to remind me to do them on a regular basis.  The spaces for “this week” and “this month” are the same size as a standard post-it note.  Just write the items that you need to accomplish this week or this month on a post-it note, and transfer the post-it notes to each new page instead of re-writing your list for longer range items.

You can download the Kidmin To Do list for free.  Hopefully it will help you stay organized and focused on what you need to do.

 

Changing Curriculum? How To Transition Your Volunteers To Something New.

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Change is usually pretty difficult for most people.  If you are thinking of trying something new when it comes to lessons in your kids ministry, it’s probably a good idea to help your volunteers process the change.  Here are some things I learned along the journey of transitioning my team to a new curriculum.

  1.  Do your research.  Before you decide to make the change, find out what your volunteers like about your current curriculum, and what is not working.  Then research what options could potentially solve some of your challenges, or take your kids ministry to a new level.
  2. Decide on your budget.  There are some really great FREE options out there that are worth investigating.  Life Church’s Kids Curriculum, Crossroads Kids Club, NewSpring Church and Kids Kount Publishing are some great FREE options.  If you have some $$ to spend, then there are many options available.  When I transitioned my team of 200 volunteers, we switched to The Gospel Project for Kids.
  3. Communicate.  You can never over communicate.  Email short emails.  Send volunteers little bits of info at a time.  Send them sample videos.  Send them a sample lesson.  Let them know some of the benefits the new curriculum will bring.
  4. Invite them to a meeting.  Invite your key leaders or teachers to come to see and hear about the new curriculum.  Have samples printed off, and outline what changes will be taking place.
  5. Take the new Curriculum on a Test Drive.  Tell your volunteers that you are going to try something new.  They might be more open to a ‘test drive’ than a big change that is set in stone.  Try it out for a few months, and then decide if you are going to keep going with the new curriculum.
  6. Ask for Feedback.  Ask how things are going.  Tweak things along the way that need tweaking.  Listen to your volunteers to see if the new curriculum will be helpful or you need to go back to the drawing board.

How Gru (from Dispicable Me) can teach your Small Group Leaders how to “OWN” their role instead of “RENT” it

despicable-me-GruGetting volunteers to “OWN” their ministry can sometimes be difficult.  Sue Miller & Adam Duckworth talk about this in one of the chapters in their book, “Not Normal” which can be found here:
http://www.amazon.com/Not-Normal-Quirks-Incredible-Volunteers/dp/1941259154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1435792421&sr=8-1&keywords=not+normal+sue+miller

Basically, it’s about caring more about what they do.  It’s about doing the best they can possibly do, for the maximum impact.

WingClips is a website that takes clips from movies, and categorizes them by theme.  This is helpful when looking for a video clip to illustrate a point.  On this website, there are two clips from “Despicable Me”.

Clip #1http://www.wingclips.com/movie-clips/despicable-me/sleepy-kittens

Gru reads a bedtime story to the 3 girls who come to live with him.  He basically doesnt’ want to read it to them, but he agrees to read it, just to get them to stop bothering him.

Clip #2http://www.wingclips.com/movie-clips/despicable-me/changed-his-heart

Gru has had a change of heart.  The children have had an impact on him that he wasn’t expecting.  He has grown to love them.  This time he reads a bedtime story to them with a whole new attitude.  It’s a story that he wrote himself and shows how much his heart has changed towards them.

These two clips are a great illustration of the difference in the approach a Small Group Leader can choose to take.  One approach is basically doing the job to get it done.  The other shows what can happen when a leader takes the time to care for their kids.  Both the kids & the leader are changed.

Many thanks to one of my amazing volunteers on my kids ministry team who came up with this idea.  Way to go Anne!

Are Your Volunteers Going in Circles?

Concentric Circles for Volunteers

When I think of volunteers, this is the picture that I have in my head.  Volunteers are in different stages.  Some are new, or come occasionally while others are the committed people that do the majority of the work.  As I look at these circles, here are some thoughts:

1.  Always be recruiting to your outer circle.  Ask people to be helpers.  Ask them to help with admin work, or organizing stuff.  Ask them to help with shopping for supplies.  Ask them to help at special events.  Ask them to help as fill-ins or floaters.  Ask them to serve once a month.  When you find you have only a few leaders, and can’t think of anyone to ask to fill leadership roles, it is probably because you haven’t been recruiting to your outer circle on a regular basis.

2.  People need to spend time in the outer circles before moving towards the inner circle.  It gives you time to get to know them, and find out what they are passionate about or what they are gifted at doing.  It also gives them time to learn about your culture & what you value in your ministry.

3.  Help volunteers move towards the inner circle.  Help irregular volunteers become regular volunteers by providing opportunities that will fit their passions, gifts & availability.  Help regular volunteers become leaders by showing them how their influence can be multiplied as they lead a team of people.

4.  To help people move towards the inner circle, you will need to personally ask them.  Go for coffee with them, share your vision & help them see how the shift towards the middle will be a win/win for them & for the people they are serving.

5.  Spend time with your inner circle.  Encourage them & appreciate them.  Motivate them & challenge them.  Invest in them.  Take them to conferences & visit other churches to help them grow.  Remind them why we do what we do.

One of the best gifts a leader can give to their team

There are some things that only the leader of a team can do.  Bill Hybels talks about the gift of ENERGY that a leader can give to their team & the difference it will make.  In this video he talks about going from feeling anxious & overwhelmed to feeling focused and energized on the leadership goals that were in front of him.